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Greater Atlanta Coin Show
2022, our 35th year of monthly coin shows
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Next Monthly Coin Show

Coin Show - Monthly Notes for December 2021

Mark your calendar and join us at the next show on Sunday, January 9, 2022 in the Joe Mack Wilson ballroom.

This will be the first monthly show of 2022 and will be an opportunity to see what's new in the dealers' showcases.

There will be many displays of coins, currency, bullion, exonumia, scripophily, semi-precious stones, jewelry and other interesting items in the dealers' showcases.

Doors open at 9am for guests to visit the bourse for buying, selling, trading or just looking at the different collectible and historical items in the dealers' displays.


In the event circumstances impact the show, check with this web site, the recorded show message (770-772-4359) or join our mailing list to receive information about the shows.

Make a reminder note and visit the next Greater Atlanta Coin Show on Sunday, January 9, 2022 in the Joe Mack Wilson ballroom to join the fun and view the items on the bourse.
The December 2021 Greater Atlanta Coin Show welcomed guests to the last show of the year with a bourse filled with dealers and their numismatic treasures on display.

Though the weather forecast mentioned rain for Sunday evening, the morning presented a light rain with mild temperatures. 

But, people still came to enjoy the displays with some buying, some selling, some browsing and some wanting appraisals for their items.

We thank all of you who came to the show and helped make the bourse a busy and interesting place to spend a few hours on a rainy day.
We also appreciate the dealers who bring the many treasures of coins, currency, bullion and other collectibles to fill displays for guests to browse, buy, sell and trade.

As always, we thank our security and the hotel's staff for their efforts setting up and supporting the show each month.

People haven't quite gone back to pre-pandemic meetings and holiday celebrations as yet. But, the hotel did have a group coming in after we left on Sunday evening. If it was a party, we hope they had fun.

Quite a few people brought items to the show for appraisal. Some of these were inherited items that they wanted an idea of their value.
Some people choose to sell after obtaining the appraised value, while others prefer to keep Grandpa's or Dad's or Uncle Henry's collection. Either choice is perfectly okay.

This month, someone brought a very nice uncirculated trade dollar wanting input on the grade. Depending on the year, the mintage and the grade, trade dollars can bring a nice valuation.

On a different note, someone brought in several better date Morgan dollars in a nice condition, however they were counterfeit. He had purchased these at a flea market and thought he had found valuable Morgan dollars. He planned to return them to the seller at the flea market to recover his initial purchase cost. We hope he was successful.

Now, let's take a look at just a couple of as-seen-on-the-bourse items.

Gold Certificate 10 Dollars - Series 1922

Gold Certificate Ten Dollars Series 1922
Begun in 1865, there were nine total issues with the last occurring with the 1922 series.

Only the fourth, seventh, eighth and ninth issues gained any wide circulation.

The ninth issue included all denominations from $10 to $1000.

This particular gold certificate includes an image of Michael Hillegas, the first treasurer of the United States serving from 1775 to 1789.

Across the top, the note reads "This certifies that there have been deposited in the Treasury of the" and below that "United States of America."

Yes, it's a coin show, but numismatics includes paper money as well.

This first item is a Ten Dollar Gold Certificate from series 1922.

Some paper money enthusiasts consider the gold certificates as the most attractive of the US paper money, in part, due to the orange colored printing on the currency.
Across the bottom, "Ten Dollars in Gold Coin Payable to the Bearer on Demand."

At the left, "This certificate is a legal tender in the amount thereof in payment of all debts and dues public and private. Acts of march 14, 1900, as amended and December 24, 1919."

For comparison, a modern ten dollar bill shows just how large the gold certificate ten dollar currency was way back when.

Gold Certificate 50 Dollars - Series 1922


Across the top of the currency is "Gold Certificate" twice.

Along the bottom is "This certifies that there have been deposited in the Treasury of the United States of America Fifty Dollars in Gold Coin Payable to the Bearer on Demand."

Like the $10, the $50 Gold Certificate lists over a gold 50, "This certificate is a legal tender in the amount thereof in payment of all debts and dues public and private. Acts of march 14, 1900, as amended and December 24, 1919."

Both of these notes remind us of when gold actually backed our currency.

They are beautiful specimens of our currency's history.
The next item is another Gold Certificate, this time representing Fifty Dollars.

Again, this is from the ninth issue and is a series 1922 gold certificate note.

This one includes an image of Grant just like today's $50 currency shows Grant's image.
Gold Certificate Fifty Dollars Series 1922